If You’re On-Time, You’re In A Rush

“If you’re on-time, you’re late.”

Sounds wise and shocking, until you realize it’s not. Impressive, because it takes something acceptable and makes it sound as though it’s completely unacceptable. Clever.

You get a little older and realize this is a lie. Kind of like when you clock-in at the last minute, fly into the parking lot by the seat of your pants a few times, show up to pick up a date at 7pm…on the dot, turn in that writing assignment to your eye-rolling professor, write “Happy Birthday” at 11:57 p.m. on someone’s facebook wall, and somehow make it to the curb with your trash can in the morning…and you know what? You got away with it. Because you’re not late. You’re in a rush. 

That’s the true saying: “If you’re on-time, you’re in a rush.”

Until now, it’s been unnoticeable to you. Because when you’re on-time, you’re good. Not great, but you’re good. And who’s going to tell you about this? Nobody. Because it’s your right. And you’re abusing it or giving up a life of peaceful, swift, and graceful entries in and out of each experience during the course of your very hurried life.

Think about it. You’re always in motion. Everything in your schedule leading up to an event and deadline in your life is now a slave to perfection and the absence of friction when you’re on-time. You don’t get to smoothly transition. You get to hurry. What used to be a negligible amount of change or deviation is now a deal-breaker. Traffic is a something to worry about. Married and a family man? Ask me how that works. Wait, don’t. I’ll tell you. Your wife can’t forget anything on the way to the car. Your kids can’t forget their favorite toy. You don’t get to look for your favorite station on the radio. The car will remain on 0 miles to empty. You will run to work. You will breathe heavily even after you’ve “made it”. Because you don’t have time on your side anymore. You surrendered that partnership when you waited until it was too late to be early.

On the other hand, you don’t have to make people wonder. You don’t have to be the person that others would love to hate, but can’t. It would have been easier to say “You don’t have to be difficult”, but that’s really what I meant to say there.

Instead of breaking even with your day, let me repeat that…instead of BREAKING EVEN with your day (meaning you gained nothing), why not invest in a small reserve of time that allows for human error? Avoid frustration. You’ll have to acknowledge that you can’t control everything, and that necessitates the need for a cushion of reserve time before the next appointment or commitment you’ve made. But trust me, it’s worth it. You’re less of a headache that way. You have less headaches that way. Ever seen the guy that always has a silly reason for being late when he finally is? Nobody cares a whole lot about that guy. They sympathize, but they can’t change him. Be the master of your schedule and make “early” the ideal, not simply the “noble” thing to do.

And whatever you do, do it now.

 

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Tackling Y for the Sake of X: Addressing One Problem to Fix Another, and Loving It

You have a problem. Up until this point in the office, it’s gone unnoticed. How do we make the solution more attractive and deserving of immediate attention? Easy. Address a bigger or more pressing dilemma.

Improving your work environment is usually contingent upon the approval of someone in a position of higher authority. This presents you with the challenge of compelling rather than begging your boss to address your needs and wants.

Let’s call this: problem X. This can be your office supplies, computer equipment, office staffing, approval for an increased budget, etc….

Now, let’s look beyond Problem X to Problem Y.

Boss: “Well, that would be a huge help. Scanning into PDF form, utilizing a shared drive on the computer, and batching our paperwork processing would save us a lot space when filing and for documents subject to retention periods. We needed to figure something out on that front. So thank you.”

You: “Perfect. While we’re at it, can we purchase a desktop scanner? Something cost-efficient that would enable me to remain at my desk and upload files right away would speed up the process. It would free up the main printer for the rest of the office as well.”

Boss: “I don’t see why not. Send me a few quotes and I’ll bring it up at the next quarterly meeting.”

You’re willingness to become more efficient will often necessitate the need or increase the appeal of accommodating your requests. Rather than simply doing more to appear worthy of a favor, continue the theme of exchanged services (which is really what a job is to begin with) and position yourself to receive the benefit of efficiency. Oil the machine that pays you. Fix a bigger problem than the one you already have. One that is connected to the original issue you’re dealing with. You’ll find much more satisfaction in the return.

The reason behind this approach lies in the worst-case scenario.

“No.”

What are you left with? The idea you had originally pitched has been approved, so there is still some progress with your overall work ethic and daily strategy. Build yourself up and hope that the pack follows suit or is swept up in the fervor. Over time, a consistent stream of ideas will make the idea of change and spending the ideal rather than a break from the ordinary.